Science of Reading:
Your guide to making the shift

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Jump to a section 1. What is SoR? 2. Why SoR? 3. SoR adoption 4. Middle school 5. Insights

Now's your chance—move your district to Science of Reading instruction and change lives forever. We'll show you how.

Real educators making the shift

Hear words of wisdom and lessons learned from leaders and experts around the world who are making this crucial shift.

What is the Science of Reading?

The Science of Reading refers to the pedagogy and practices proven by extensive research to effectively teach children how to read.

New to the Science of Reading? We’ve outlined everything you need to get acquainted with the movement in our blog series, “What is the Science of Reading Anyway?”

 

Why it matters

Here are three reasons why your district should make the shift to instruction based on the Science of Reading today.

Student using a pencil to trace his place in a book

Leading a Science of Reading adoption

How can you transform your district with Science of Reading instruction? Try this step-by-step process.

Yellow, blue, and orange graphic with letters, ribbons, and a book
Teacher standing over a student reading to her

Bringing the Science of Reading to middle school classrooms

Your middle schoolers need to build strong foundational skills and an academic knowledge base that will prepare them for success in high school and beyond. Find out how the Science of Reading can help.

 

Three children seated while the teacher points out something in a book

Insights

Hear, watch, and read expert insights that will help you transform your district with the Science of Reading. 

  1. 1. Subscribe to Science of Reading: The Podcast.
  2. 2. Follow our Science of Reading blog.
  3. 3. Join our Facebook community.
  4. 4. Watch our Science of Reading webinars.
  5. 5. Sample our programs based on the Science of Reading.

Celebrate Science of Reading superheroes in your district—nominate a colleague for a Science of Reading Star Award!

Graphic of an awards trophy, young boy writing, and two students walking out of school